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My Health Record

Information for healthcare providers and organisations

 

Overview

My Health Record is a secure online summary of key patient health information. Healthcare providers can access the system to view and add information.

Healthcare provider benefits

  • provides immediate access to key health information
  • facilitates the validation and verification of clinical information
  • avoid adverse medication events and access to allergy information
  • saves time requesting and gathering information
  • avoids duplication of tests and diagnostic imaging
  • provides immunisation details
  • informs end of life care
  • improves continuity of care

Patient benefits

  • prompt access to key health information in an emergency
  • secure, convenient access to health information
  • safer, faster more efficient care
  • less need to remember key aspects of their medical history and medications
  • improved management of health information
  • informed self-management of health conditions

Legislation

Healthcare provider organisations participating in the system are required to understand and comply with a range of legislative obligations including the following legislation:

What's in a record

Records contain key health information like immunisations, pathology and diagnostic imaging reports, prescription and dispensing information, hospital discharge summaries and more, all in one place.

Views and overviews

A quick, easy way to find information in a patient's record

These documents are system generated and consolidate the information in a person’s record. In an emergency department (ED) setting, they can help clinicians find information quickly.

Immunisation Consolidated View

This view displays details of a patient's immunisations recorded in the Australian Immunisation Register (AIR) and in any shared health summaries or event summaries, in their record.

The view shows immunisation history including date, disease, and vaccine details, including batch number and vial serial number, dose, source, and a link to the source document.

Medicare Overview

Medicare information may include:

PBS/RPBS claims information

Prescription information from Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS) and Repatriation Schedule of Pharmaceutical Benefits (RPBS).

Australian Organ Donor Register status

The patient’s organ and/or tissue donor decisions are sourced from the Australian Organ Donor Register.

Australian Immunisation Register

Details of patient's immunisations as recorded in the Australian Immunisation Register (AIR).

MBS/DVA claims information

Medicare Benefits Schedule (MBS) and Department of Veterans’ Affairs (DVA) claims information.

Medicines Information View

This view brings together medicines-related information, including allergies and adverse reactions, from documents held in a patient’s record. Information is gathered from:

  • the patient's most recent (up to 2 years) prescription and dispense records and other PBS claims information
  • the patient's most recent shared health summary and discharge summary
  • available event summaries, specialist letters, e-Referral notes and pharmacist shared medicines list uploaded to the patient's record since their latest shared health summary
  • the patient's personal health summary, which may include any allergies or adverse reactions and other key information

Pathology and Diagnostic Imaging Reports Overview

This overview allows healthcare providers to get a quick snapshot of a patient's test result history. These overviews show multiple reports within a specific date range on one page.

Healthcare provider uploads

Clinical documents uploaded by doctors, pharmacists and other clinicians

Shared health summary

This is a summary of a patient’s health status at a point in time, which can include medical conditions, medicines, allergies and adverse reactions, and immunisations. A shared health summary is created by an individual’s nominated healthcare provider, as defined in the My Health Records Act, with the information extracted from their local clinical information system.

A nominated healthcare provider may be: 

  • a registered medical practitioner
  • a registered nurse
  • an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health practitioner with a Cert IV in Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Primary Health Care

The nominated healthcare provider is generally the patient's usual healthcare provider who is delivering coordinated and comprehensive care to the patient (for example their regular GP).

Note: an enrolled nurse is not permitted by the My Health Records Act to author/create a shared health summary. An enrolled nurse can create an event summary to share information about a significant clinical event, provided the enrolled nurse is providing healthcare to the patient. 

Examples of when to create a shared health summary include: 

  • when completing a patient health assessment (for example a GP Management Plan, 75+ Assessment, or child health check) 
  • when there are significant changes to a patient’s health status in any of the four key areas: patient’s medical conditions, medicines, allergies/adverse reactions or immunisations

The shared health summary should be created in consultation with the patient. A patient has only one current shared health summary at a time.

View an example of a shared health summary.

Discharge summaries

Discharge summaries provide the details of the patient's hospital stay and recommendations for care after discharge.

When a discharge summary is created, it is sent directly to the intended recipient, in accordance with current practices. When a hospital is connected to the system, a copy of the discharge summary can also be uploaded to the patient's record.

Prescription and dispense records

Prescription and dispense records contain information about medicines that have been prescribed and dispensed, and details about both the healthcare provider that prescribed or dispensed the medicine/s and the healthcare organisation.

Pathology reports

Pathology reports can be uploaded by registered pathology laboratories.

The reports are immediately available to all members of the patient’s healthcare team, subject to any access controls the patient may have set. Patients will need to wait seven days before being able to view them in their record (with some exceptions).

Learn more about pathology reports.

See which pathology labs are connected.

Diagnostic imaging reports

Diagnostic imaging reports can be uploaded by registered diagnostic imaging services.

The reports will be immediately available to all members of the patient’s healthcare team, subject to any access controls the patient may have set. Patients will need to wait seven days before being able to view them in their record (with some exceptions). 

Learn more about diagnostic imaging reports.

See which diagnostic imaging services are connected.

Specialist letters

Specialist letters are used by a treating specialist to respond to a referrer (for example a GP) about a referred patient. When a specialist writes back to the referrer, the letter may also be uploaded to the patient's record.

Event summary

Event summaries capture key health information about a significant healthcare event that is relevant to the ongoing care of an individual. It may be used to indicate a clinical intervention, improvement in a condition or that a treatment has been started or completed.

An event summary may contain: 

  • allergies and adverse reactions
  • medicines
  • diagnoses
  • interventions
  • immunisations
  • diagnostic investigations

Event summaries are intended for healthcare providers who are not the patient’s regular provider / nominated healthcare provider. 

They can be created and uploaded by any healthcare provider with a Healthcare Provider Identifier–Individual (HPI-I) who is working at a participating healthcare organisation and involved in the patient’s care with conformant software. 

Examples of when to create an Event Summary include:  

  • Patients visiting an after-hours medical service 
  • Holidaying patients 
  • Patients visiting from another area 
  • Patients receiving an immunisation or flu vaccine. 

Generally, an event summary is used when it is not appropriate for the healthcare provider to create and upload a shared health summary, discharge summary or specialist letter. 

Goals of Care

A goals of care document is created by a healthcare provider through a shared decision-making process with the person in their care and family/carer. This is done to capture medical and non-medical goals of care in the context of end-of-life care.

eReferrals

When a healthcare provider creates an eReferral, it will be sent directly to the intended recipient, as per current practices. A copy may also be sent to the patient's record.

Pharmacist Shared Medicines List

The Pharmacist Shared Medicines List is a list of medicines a person is known to be taking including prescribed, over the counter, and complementary medicines. This document can only be authored by a pharmacist, but can be viewed by other healthcare providers.

Consumer uploads

Information added by the record holder that they think is important

Personal health summary

Individuals can enter free text information about allergies and adverse reactions as well as current medications, including over the counter or complementary medicines. This will appear as "patient-entered" information in the Medicines Overview. 

Personal health notes

Individuals can enter information to help them keep track of their health and key health events. The system dates each note, which includes an entered title and the entered text. These notes are not visible to healthcare providers.

Advance care planning information

Advance care planning information can be uploaded to a patient's record and can contain their wishes for future health and care. The individual can also enter details of their Advance Care Document Custodian who holds a copy of their advance care planning document. This could be an individual or organisation. 

Emergency contact details

Individuals can list their emergency contacts and healthcare providers can view these via the National Provider Portal (NPP)

Child development information

Parents or guardians can record results of their child's scheduled health checks, development, and other useful information.

Register and set up access

See how to establish policies, register your organisation, and access the system.

STEP 1: Establishing policies

Healthcare organisations must operate in accordance with relevant policies and legislation when participating in the system. They must establish, review, update, maintain, enforce and promote policies that ensure the system is used safely and responsibly by staff.

Prior to registering to participate in the system, your organisation will need to have a Security and Access policy in place. See the Healthcare provider organisation obligations section (below) for details.

You will also need to assign a responsible officer and an organisation maintenance officer to act as the system administrators and key contacts for your organisation in relation to participation in the system.

To learn more about this requirement, the Agency has developed security and access policy checklists.

These checklists are guides only, and should be assessed against the needs and risks that may apply to your organisation.

Healthcare provider organisations need to ensure the policy includes and addresses the topics outlined in Rule 42 of the My Health Records Rule as outlined below. 

Privacy and access policy templates

Policy requirements checklists

1. Healthcare provider organisation policies
  • A written My Health Record Security and Access policy is in place prior to the healthcare provider organisation registering to participate in the system, and the policy is maintained on an ongoing basis. 
  • The policy is communicated and remains accessible to all employees.
  • The policy is communicated with any healthcare providers to whom the organisation supplies services under contract, and remains accessible to these providers. For example, a healthcare provider organisation that supplies information technology services to individual healthcare providers to enable them to access the system, must communicate the policy to these providers. 
  • The policy is enforced in relation to all employees and any healthcare providers to whom the organisation supplies services under contract. 
2. Manner of authorising and process for suspending and deactivating user accounts
  • The policy details the manner of authorising persons accessing the system via or on behalf of the healthcare provider organisation.
  • The policy outlines the ways a user account is suspended and/or deactivated in the following circumstances:
    • A user leaves the organisation
    • A user’s security is compromised
    • A user has changed duties and no longer requires access to the system
3. Training for authorised users, before they access the system
  • The policy includes a requirement that, before a user is authorised to access the system, they receive training covering:
    • How to use the system accurately and responsibly 
    • Legal obligations of the healthcare provider organisation and people who access the system on behalf of the organisation 
    • Consequences of breaching those obligations 
  • The Agency is planning to publish a recommended training checklist and declaration form that may support your organisation in meeting this legislative requirement.
  • It is recommended that organisations maintain a register of staff training.
4. Process for identifying the individual who accesses a person’s record (on each occasion)
  • The policy outlines the process for identifying a person who requests access to a healthcare recipient’s record and communicating the person’s identity to the My Health Record System Operator (Australian Digital Health Agency).
  • Generally, this would occur via the My Health Record National Provider Portal, or clinical information systems, where:
    • the clinical software is used to assign and record unique internal staff member identification codes, including a Healthcare Provider Identifier-Individual (HPI-I); and
    • the unique identification code, or the provider’s HPI-I, is recorded by the clinical software and automatically provided to the System Operator for each instance of system access.

Note: See the legislative obligations for communicating to the System Operator under Section 74 of the My Health Records Act.

5. Physical and Information Security Measures, including user account management processes
  • The policy details the physical and information security measures that are in place to mitigate information security risks and prevent unauthorised access.
  • People accessing the system via or on behalf of the healthcare provider organisation understand and adhere to the physical and information security measures.
  • The healthcare provider organisation employs reasonable user account management practices, including:
    • Restricting access to those persons who require access as part of their duties
    • Uniquely identifying individuals using the healthcare provider organisation’s information technology systems
    • Having that unique identity protected by a password or equivalent protection mechanism
    • Ensuring password and/or other access mechanisms are sufficiently secure and robust to mitigate the security and privacy risks associated with unauthorised access to the system
    • Disabling the user accounts of persons no longer authorised to access the system
    • Suspending a user account as soon as practicable after becoming aware that the account or its password or access mechanism has been compromised.

Note: See the Agency’s cyber security resources for more information. Additional guidance is provided in the Guide to Securing Personal Information and the Guide to Health Privacy on the Office of the Australian Information Commissioner website.

6. Strategies for identifying, responding to, and reporting system-related security risks
  • The policy describes the mitigation strategies used by the healthcare provider organisation to ensure the system-related security risks can be:
    • promptly identified
    • acted upon
    • reported to the healthcare provider organisation’s management.
  • This should include processes for identifying and reporting:
    • unauthorised access to the  system
    • any matters that may compromise the security or integrity of the system, for example, a security incident, such as ransomware, that has affected a healthcare provider organisation.
  • Organisations should ensure processes are in place to comply with data breach notification obligations outlined in section 75 of the My Health Records Act. Learn more about how to manage a data breach further down the page.
  • To assist with monitoring use of the system, audit logs should record the user identity, date and time of access, whose record was accessed and the type of information that was accessed.
7. Assisted Registration (if offered)
  • Where the healthcare provider offers assisted registration, this topic is required within the policy. If the organisation does not offer assisted registration, it is recommended that this is noted in the policy.
  • Assisted registration is where a healthcare provider assists healthcare recipients to register for a record.
  • The policy needs to outline the methods for:
    • Authorising employees of the organisation to provide assisted registration
    • Providing training before a person is authorised to provide assisted registration
    • Confirming a healthcare recipient’s consent to be registered
    • Identifying a healthcare recipient for the purposes of assisted registration, including the process and criteria that must apply

Note: See the legislative requirements for confirming a healthcare recipient’s consent under Rule 9 of the My Health Records (Assisted Registration) Rule.

8. Policy implementation and maintenance
  • The My Health Record Security and Access policy must be reviewed annually (at a minimum) and when any material new or changed risks are identified (such as a change within the system, organisation, or regulation; or factors that might result in unauthorised access, use or disclosure of information in a record).
  • The policy must include a unique version number and date of effect.
  • A copy of each version of the policy must be retained by the organisation.

Note: The Agency or the Office of the Australian Information Commissioner may request a current or previous version of your organisation’s Security and Access policy at any time. The legislation specifies that a healthcare provider organisation must comply with a request to provide a copy of the policy within 7 days of receiving the request.

More information

The Office of the Australian Information Commissioner provides Rule 42 guidance outlining points for healthcare provider organisations to consider when developing their My Health Record Security and Access policy. General guidance is also available to help you protect health information.

Steps to register and set up access are outlined on this page.

Healthcare Identifier

To be eligible to register to participate in the system, your organisation will need to obtain a Healthcare Identifier. Use of Healthcare Identifiers is governed by the Healthcare Identifiers Act. The HI Act requires that an organisation take reasonable steps to protect healthcare identifiers from misuse and loss, and unauthorised access, modification or disclosure. 

For additional guidance, see the above section on registering with the Healthcare Identifiers (HI) Service and the My Health Record system. 

List of authorised individuals

In order to participate in the system, you will need to establish and maintain an up-to-date list of individuals authorised to access the system on your behalf. 

STEP 2: Register your organisation

Register for a PRODA account

Provider Digital Access (PRODA) is an online authentication system for healthcare organisations to securely access government online services, such as Health Professional Online Services (HPOS).

Your organisation will need to identify who will be acting in the role of a Responsible Officer (RO). This person will be responsible for the practice and may be the owner or manager of the organisation. The RO will have primary responsibility for the practice's compliance with participation requirements, ensuring that the practice and its employees comply with the relevant legislation, policies and regulations.

This individual will need to register for a PRODA account (if they do not already have one). Information for how to register is available here.

Helpful registration tips:

  • Ensure the name you register the account with has the same name as all your documents, or a Change of Name certificate is provided as supporting documentation.
  • Confirm the gender on the account matches the documents.
  • Confirm the DOB is entered correctly
  • The email address used to register the Individual PRODA account should not be a publicly accessible email address such as an admin account.

Link to Health Professional Online Service (HPOS)

When you first log in to PRODA, you will need to link to HPOS. Visit Services Australia to link HPOS to your PRODA account. You will then be able to access a range of eligible services using only your PRODA log in. Learn more

Register with the Healthcare Identifiers Service

Once the RO has registered for PRODA and linked HPOS to their account, they can register the organisation with the Healthcare Identifiers (HI) Service. This national service underpins the secure transmission of digital health data by uniquely identifying healthcare organisations, healthcare provider individuals and healthcare recipient individuals.

Once registered with the HI Service, your organisation is issued with a unique HPI-O number. This number is used to identify the organisation in a range of national digital health initiatives.

From the HPOS ‘My programs’ page:

  • Select the ‘My Health Record and Healthcare Identifiers’ tile
  • Select ‘Healthcare Identifiers - Register seed organisation’
  • Complete the online form to register your seed organisation
  • For more information, visit the Services Australia website

Healthcare providers hold a Healthcare Provider Identifier - Individual (HPI-I) 

All healthcare providers registered with the Australian Health Practitioner Regulation Agency (AHPRA) will already have an HPI-I. To find your HPI-I you can:

  • Log in to the AHPRA website or
  • Call AHPRA on 1300 419 495 Monday to Friday 9:00am - 5:00pm (local time)

Note: If you know your AHPRA User ID, add 800361 to the front of the ID to get your HPI-I.

If you practice a health profession not regulated by AHPRA, you can apply for an HPI-I by completing the online application in Health Professional Online Services (HPOS).

Link the HPI-I to the organisation's HPI-O

For a healthcare provider representing a healthcare organisation to access the NPP, the practice manager/administrator must link their HPI-I to the organisation's HPI-O. This can be done by:

Once successful linking has occurred, healthcare providers representing the organisation can access the NPP.

If your organisation is not yet registered in the HI Service and My Health Record, see below.

Register the organisation in the HI Service and My Health Record

If your organisation does not already have a Healthcare Provider Identifier – Organisation (HPI-O), the practice owner needs to register it with the HI Service and My Health Record. To register:

  • Log on to PRODA account
  • Select Go to Service on the HPOS tile in HPOS, select My programs and then select the Healthcare Identifiers and My Health Record tile
  • Select the My Health Record – Register Organisation tile, and complete the online form to register the Seed Organisation
  • If the organisation is not known to the HI Service, the applicant will need to provide evidence that they have the authority to make decisions on behalf of the organisation by uploading documents in the Seed Organisation registration application

Once the registration is complete, the applicant will receive a notification in their HPOS Mail Centre.

STEP 3: Choose how to access the system

In most healthcare settings, access to the system is via conformant clinical software or the National Provider Portal.

In hospital applications, access can be via the Healthcare Information Provider Service (HIPS) or HIPS Mobile.

See below for how to access the system using these methods.

Conformant clinical software

Use your organisation's software to access the system

Many common clinical information systems (CISs) conform to the system standard and can connect directly to the system. This means that healthcare providers are generally able to access, view and upload information to a patient's record through their conformant CIS.

Click here to check whether your clinical software conforms to the standard.

NASH PKI Certificates

The National Authentication Service for Health (NASH) is used by healthcare organisations to securely access and share health information. A NASH Public Key Infrastructure (PKI) Certificate is required for access to the HI Service. This certificate can be requested, linked and downloaded through HPOS by your Organisation Maintenance Officer (OMO). In a healthcare organisation, the role of OMO may be assigned to a staff member who is familiar with the practice’s administration systems. Alternatively, the RO may take on the OMO role as well.

Request and download a NASH PKI Certificate (if required)

Check with your software vendor whether you need to have a NASH PKI Certificate or whether they will be interacting with the My Health Record system as a Contracted Service Provider (CSP).

Configure Software

Contact your software vendor or check their website and follow the steps to configure your software and set-up access for your team.

National Provider Portal (NPP)

View records without using conformant clinical software

Healthcare providers who do not have conformant clinical software, can access an individual’s record through the National Provider Portal. The NPP is a web-based, read-only site that allows healthcare providers to view the information in a patient's record. The uploading of documents is not supported.

To use the NPP, healthcare providers need to get set up first. Your organisation will also need a Healthcare Provider Identifier - Organisation (HPI-O) and be registered to participate in the system.

Set up access to the NPP

Step 1: Register for an individual PRODA account

Provider Digital Access (PRODA) is an online authentication system used to securely access government online services. If you are a healthcare provider wanting to access the NPP or a practice owner/administrator wanting to access services using PRODA, you need to register as an individual to get your own account.

If you do not have a PRODA account you can register here.

Helpful registration tips:

  • Ensure the name you register the account with has the same name as all your documents, or a Change of Name certificate is provided as supporting documentation
  • Confirm the gender on the account matches the documents
  • Confirm the DOB is entered correctly
  • The email address used to register the Individual PRODA account should not be a publicly accessible email address such as an admin account

Step 2: Healthcare providers hold a Healthcare Provider Identifier - Individual (HPI-I)

All healthcare providers registered with the Australian Health Practitioner Regulation Agency (AHPRA) will already have an HPI-I. To find your HPI-I you can:

  • Log in to the AHPRA website or
  • Call AHPRA on 1300 419 495 Monday to Friday 9:00am - 5:00pm (local time).

Note: If you know your AHPRA User ID, add 800361 to the front of the ID to get your HPI-I.

If you practice a health profession not regulated by AHPRA, you can apply for an HPI-I by completing the online application in Health Professional Online Services (HPOS).

Step 3: Link the HPI-I to the organisation's HPI-O

For a healthcare provider representing a healthcare organisation to access the NPP, the practice manager/administrator must link their HPI-I to the organisation's HPI-O. This can be done by:

Once successful linking has occurred, healthcare providers representing the organisation can access the NPP.

If your organisation is not yet registered in the HI Service and My Health Record, see Step 4 below.

Step 4: Register the organisation in the HI Service and My Health Record

If your organisation does not already have a Healthcare Provider Identifier – Organisation (HPI-O), the practice owner needs to register it with the HI Service and My Health Record. To register:

  • Log on to PRODA account
  • Select Go to Service on the HPOS tile in HPOS, select My programs and then select the Healthcare Identifiers and My Health Record tile
  • Select the My Health Record – Register Organisation tile, and complete the online form to register the Seed Organisation
  • If the organisation is not known to the HI Service, the applicant will need to provide evidence that they have the authority to make decisions on behalf of the organisation by uploading documents in the Seed Organisation registration application.

Once the registration is complete, the applicant will receive a notification in their HPOS Mail Centre.

How to access and use the NPP

Getting started:

Step 1: Log onto the NPP

Go to provider.ehealth.gov.au/login.html to access the portal.

Step 2: Click on the 'Login' button

You will be redirected to the PRODA login page where you will be required to enter your username and password.

Step 3: Link your PRODA ID to the My Health Record system by entering your Identifier Number

You will only need to complete the linking once.

Step 4: Select the organisation you are representing

If you work for multiple healthcare provider organisations, please select the organisation you are representing in relation to your specific patient’s care.

Step 5: Search for the individual's record

Once you log in, a search screen will appear.

Add their information to the search screen to find their record. To find the individual's record, the information you enter must match their details as recorded with Medicare.

The information required includes:

  • Last name
  • Date of birth
  • Sex
  • Identifier (IHI, Medicare or DVA)

Hospital applications and HIPS Mobile

Access the system in a hospital setting

Most hospitals across Australia are already connected to the system. This means that authorised employees are generally able to access and view information in a patient’s record through the hospital's applications. If you are working in a hospital or other healthcare setting, check with your health information manager or local intranet for information on how to access the system in your organisation’s applications. Remember to check your organisation's policy regarding access and use of the system.

If your hospital requires connection support, contact [email protected]

HIPS Mobile

HIPS Mobile provides authorised employees with seamless access to their patients’ healthcare information and services, when and where they need it. It is available as an add on to existing HIPS software enabling the viewing of records on mobile devices, including mobile and tablets.

Benefits

Mobile access to HIPS allows for viewing of records on mobile and tablet where and when it is needed. This means:

  • Critical information is on hand and available to all clinicians while performing ward rounds, bedside consultations and remote care.
  • For Emergency Departments this can mean saving time, when patient history needs to be accessed in an Emergency - including medicines, pathology and Covid history including immunisations.
  • Improved management of patient information for Clinicians, who can now create specific ‘My Patient’ lists for each of the clinician’s work locations and access records on and offsite via the hospital’s VPN. This list syncs with the HIPS UI standalone view.

Education and training

Find resources to help you feel confident using the system. Detailed information, software summary sheets, training and support are all available here.

Your area of practice

Access eLearning modules, summary sheets, webinars, resources

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health

Aged care

Allied health

eLearning Modules
Access to the National Provider Portal
  • See "National Provider Portal (NPP)" section above.
Webinar recordings
Training

Community pharmacy

eLearning Modules
Clinical software summary sheets

Scroll down to find summary sheets for these and other software products:

  • Aquarius
  • Corum LOTS
  • Dispense Works
  • Fred, Minfos
  • Z Dispense
  • National Provider Portal
Webinar recordings
Resources
On demand training environment
  • Fred Dispense - see "Training simulators" section below.
Training

General practitioners

eLearning Modules
Fact sheets
Clinical software summary sheets

Scroll to the next section to find step-by-step guides to performing tasks within the system, for general practice.

  • Best Practice Premier
  • Communicare
  • Genie
  • MedicalDirector
  • Medtech32
  • Naitonal Provider Portal
  • Zedmed
Videos
Webinar recordings
Training

Also see RACGP Resources about My Health Record.

Hospitals

Nursing and midwifery

Pathology services

Please refer to the software guides used in your laboratory or radiology information systems to learn more about viewing and uploading information to My Health Record in your organisation. 

Staff in the pathology laboratory or diagnostic imaging practice need to be aware of how to action a request to ‘Do not send’. Further information can also be found in the eLearning modules below.  

eLearning Modules

In practice

Training

Diagnostic imaging services

Please refer to the software guides used in your laboratory or radiology information systems to learn more about viewing and uploading information to My Health Record in your organisation. 

Staff in the pathology laboratory or diagnostic imaging practice need to be aware of how to action a request to ‘Do not send’. Further information can also be found in the eLearning modules below.  

eLearning Modules

In practice

Training

Practice management

Specialists

eLearning Modules

Clinical software summary sheets

Scroll down to find summary sheets for these and other software products:

  • Bp VIPnet
  • Genie
  • Gentu
  • Shexie
  • National Provider Portal
Webinar recordings
Training
Further resources

RACP digital health resources

Clinical software summary sheets

Step-by-step guides to performing tasks within the system

Aquarius

Best Practice Premier

Bp VIPnet

Communicare

Corum LOTS

Dispense Works

Fred Dispense

Genie

Gentu

MedicalDirector

Medtech32

Minfos

MMEx

National Provider Portal (NPP)

Z Dispense

Zedmed

Training simulators

Self-paced learning with demonstrations and simulators of the system

Software simulators (containing fictional patients and medical information) have been developed to support demonstration and self-paced learning of the system.

The range of simulated software includes:

  • Best Practice
  • Communicare
  • Consumer Portal
  • Fred Dispense
  • Genie
  • Hospitals (HIPS UI)
  • Medical Director
  • Provider Portal
  • Zedmed

Log in to the simulator dashboard to use the simulators.

Use the following credentials to log in:

  • Username: OnDemandTrainingUser
  • Password: TrainMe

Privacy and access

Under the My Health Records Act, staff members authorised by a healthcare organisation can access and view a patient’s record for the purpose of providing healthcare, and provided it is in accordance with any access controls. In addition to clinicians, a healthcare organisation may authorise other staff to access the system as part of their role in healthcare delivery. 

Healthcare providers and staff members can only access an individual’s record if:

  • they are authorised by the healthcare provider organisation to access the system, and 
  • they are providing healthcare to the individual or supporting the provision of healthcare to the individual, and 
  • the access is in accordance with any access controls the individual may have set.

The Privacy Act applies to all healthcare providers in the private sector throughout Australia. It does not apply to state and territory public sector healthcare providers. In most parts of Australia, state and territory legislation applies to public healthcare providers. In some states and territories, this legislation also applies to healthcare providers in the private sector, in addition to the Privacy Act. Additional information is available on the privacy for health service providers page of the Office of the Australian Information Commissioner (OAIC) website.

Access controls

Individuals can decide which of their healthcare provider organisations can view their health information by restricting access to their entire record, or to specific documents within it. 

Limiting access to a My Health Record 

Patients can decide which healthcare provider organisations can view or update their record by setting a Record Access Code (RAC).  

Where a RAC has been set, the healthcare recipient can choose to share this code with you, so that you can access their record. Once the patient has shared their RAC with you, you will be listed on their provider access list. Healthcare provider organisations that are listed on a patient’s provider access list won’t need the patient’s RAC to continue accessing their record.  

Limiting access to specific documents 

Where a limited document access code has been set, the healthcare recipient (or their representative(s)) can choose to provide healthcare provider organisation(s) with the limited document access code. Once a healthcare provider enters the limited document access code into their clinical information system, or the National Provider Portal, they will be able to access to the restricted document(s). Healthcare providers can still view restricted documents in an emergency.

It is important that any access codes provided by the individual are not retained by the healthcare provider organisation and are destroyed following their use. 

Access history

An individual or their nominated or authorised representative can view a list of access to their record at any time. This is known as the access history.

An individual can also choose to be notified by SMS or email when someone accesses their record or when certain changes are made.

When an individual can choose to be notified:

  • a change is made to the immunisation information in their record
  • a healthcare provider organisation accesses their record for the first time
  • a new myGov account has been linked to their record
  • a new shared health summary is added
  • a nominated representative accesses their record
  • an advance care document is added, removed or reinstated
  • the emergency access function is used by a healthcare provider organisation

Audit trails

The System Operator maintains audit trails of all activity in the My Health Record system. These may be used for the purpose of management or operation of the system, or to support audits and investigations. 

Emergency access

Healthcare providers can access information within the system for the purpose of lessening or preventing a serious threat.

By default, documents in an individual’s record are set to general access for registered healthcare provider organisations. This means a treating healthcare provider can view all documents within an individual’s record, except for information that has been entered in the personal health notes section of the record, and any documents that have been removed or hidden by the healthcare recipient (or their representative(s)).

Healthcare recipients (or their representative(s)) can choose to restrict access to their record (using a record access code) or to restrict access to specific documents (which they can share with selected organisations, using a limited document access code):

  • Where a record access code has been set, a treating healthcare provider will be prompted by their clinical information system, or the My Health Record National Provider Portal, if a record access code is required. When this occurs, the healthcare provider can ask the healthcare recipient to share the record access code.
  • Where a limited document access code has been set, the healthcare recipient (or their representative(s)) can choose to provide the treating healthcare provider with the limited document access code. The healthcare provider will need to enter the limited document access code into their clinical information system, or the My Health Record National Provider Portal, to gain access to the restricted document(s).

There are certain urgent situations, defined in Section 64 of the My Health Records Act, where it may be permissible for treating healthcare providers to access information in a person’s record without entering the relevant access code(s) using a function known as Emergency Access. This is sometimes referred to as a ‘break glass’ function. It is important to understand when this function can lawfully be used.

Appropriate use of emergency access

It is expected that the need to use Emergency Access will be rare, as Emergency Access to a healthcare recipient's record (or a restricted document within it) is only authorised under the My Health Records Act if the healthcare organisation reasonably believes that:

  1. the access is necessary to lessen or prevent a serious threat to an individual’s life, health or safety and the healthcare recipient's consent cannot reasonably be obtained. For example, due to being unconscious; or
  2. the access to the healthcare recipient’s My Heath Record is necessary to lessen or prevent a serious threat to public health or safety. For example, to identify the source of a serious infection and prevent its spread.

In addition, the majority of people have not set any access controls, which means information in their record is not restricted. In most cases, therefore, you will be able to see all available health information, for the purpose of providing healthcare, without needing to use Emergency Access.

When not to use emergency access

A person should not use Emergency Access:

  • to view their own record or a family member's record - people can access their own record via myGov or a mobile app
  • to demonstrate how to use the Emergency Access function. Training resources are available for this purpose
  • to check whether any restricted documents exist (except, in accordance with section 64 of the My Health Records Act, where the treating healthcare provider reasonably believes that access is necessary to lessen or prevent a serious threat to the individual’s life, health or safety and it is unreasonable or impracticable to provide consent; or to lessen or prevent a serious threat to public health or safety).
  • when an individual has forgotten the access code they have set (except, in accordance with section 64 of the My Health Records Act, where the treating healthcare provider reasonably believes that access is necessary to lesson or prevent a serious threat to the person’s life, health or safety; or to lessen or prevent a serious threat to public health or safety) – a person can reset their access code by logging into their record, or telephoning the My Health Record Helpline 1800 723 471.

Use of the Emergency Access function that is not authorised by section 64 of the My Health Records Act is subject to civil and/or criminal penalties under the My Health Records Act.

Additional Information

Once granted, emergency access to a record is available for a maximum of five days. When this period ends, the record reverts to the previous settings. If the emergency situation continues beyond the initial five-day period, you will need to request Emergency Access again.

Use of the Emergency Access function is recorded in the access history of the record, which can be viewed by the healthcare recipient and their authorised or nominated representative(s). In addition, healthcare recipients can choose to receive an SMS or email notification each time the Emergency Access function is used to view their record.

With Emergency Access, any access controls that the individual has set will be overridden. This means the treating healthcare provider who uses the Emergency Access function will have full access to the healthcare recipient’s record, except for information that has been entered in the personal health notes section of the record, and any documents that healthcare recipient (or its authorised representative(s) has previously removed or hidden.

Notification provisions under section 75 of the Act

It is important to note that registered healthcare provider organisations are subject to reporting obligations under section 75 of the My Health Records Act. Consequently, unauthorised use of the Emergency Access function may be reportable to the Office of the Australian Information Commissioner (OAIC) and the Agency (as System Operator).

Note

This information is general in nature, and you should obtain your own professional legal advice relevant to your circumstances.

More information

You can find out more about the My Health Record Emergency Access function from the OAIC, including:

Penalties

There are significant fines and penalties for inappropriate or unauthorised use of information. 

Actions subject to penalties include, for example:  

  • unauthorised collection, use or disclosure of health information in a record 
  • use of health information in a record for prohibited purposes 
  • unauthorised use or disclosure of healthcare identifiers or other information obtained for the purposes of the Healthcare Identifiers Service 
  • failure to give written notice within 14 days if the healthcare provider or organisation ceases to be eligible to be registered - please notify the Agency if you or your organisation ceases to be registered
  • failure to notify an actual or potential data breach in which the healthcare provider or organisation were directly involved 
  • holding, taking, processing or handling, records held for the purposes of the system outside Australia, or causing someone else to do so

System security

Security is a key design element of the system, which adheres to Australian Government security requirements.

System security

The system is managed in line with the Australian Government Protective Security Policy Framework. Data is stored in Australia, and is protected by high grade security protocols to detect and mitigate against external threats. The system is tested frequently to ensure these mechanisms are robust and working as designed.

Design features include many safeguards to protect the information stored within the system, including audit trails, technology and data management controls, as well as appropriate security measures to minimise the likelihood of unauthorised access to information in a patient’s record. In addition to these measures, the My Health Record system is protected by legislation which governs the way the system is accessed, managed and used.

In addition, healthcare providers have obligations to protect personal and health information. 

Information security advice for your business

Your business is responsible for ensuring that the systems you use to access the system are secure. Find five simple steps to protect health, personal and financial information in the guide: Information Security for small healthcare businesses

The Australian Government strongly encourages individuals, business and organisations to take steps to ensure they provide safe and secure digital health services. For online security advice and tips visit the Australian Cyber Security Centre.

When you can view and upload information

Authority to upload information to a My Health Record

Under the My Health Records Act, healthcare provider organisations are authorised to upload information to the system. This means that, subject to the situations described below, there is no requirement for a healthcare provider to obtain consent prior to uploading clinical information. There is also no requirement for a healthcare consumer to review clinical information prior to it being uploaded. 

It may be considered good clinical practice to advise a patient that you will be uploading information to their record, particularly if this information might be considered sensitive. This approach is recommended by the Australian Medical Association in its guide to using the My Health Record system (section 4.5). 

Situations where documents should not be uploaded

If a consumer specifically asks a healthcare provider organisation not to upload particular documents or information to their My Health Record, the healthcare provider organisation must comply with the person’s request. This is a condition of your organisation’s registration with the My Health Record system.

You can advise the patient about the potential risks of excluding information from their My Health Record and explain the benefits of ensuring all information is included. However, you must comply with their final decision, and not upload the information, if this is requested.

The My Health Records Act recognises that under some state and territory laws consent must be given expressly, or in a particular way, before information related to specific areas of health is disclosed.

The state and territory laws which have specific consent requirements regarding the disclosure of health information are listed in clause 3.1.1 of the My Health Records Regulation.

There are none in Western Australia, Tasmania, Northern Territory, South Australia and Victoria; there are some in the Australian Capital Territory, New South Wales and Queensland. Healthcare provider organisations in ACT, NSW and Queensland may need to obtain consent in a particular manner from the consumer or identified third party before uploading information to My Health Record, depending on the type of health information it is. 

If a state or territory law is listed in this clause, then the consent requirements of those laws overrule the provisions of the My Health Records Act.

Our clinical software summary sheets (above) have instructions on how to prevent an upload from your clinical software.

Viewing a record

Any person who is authorised by a healthcare organisation can access and view an individual’s record, for the purpose of providing healthcare services. In addition to clinicians, a healthcare organisation may authorise other staff to access the system as part of their role in healthcare delivery. 

Healthcare providers are also authorised to:

  • disclose the health information to the individual, or their authorised or nominated representative
  • collect, use or disclose the health information for any purpose with the consent of the individual
  • collect, use or disclose the health information for purposes relating to the provision of indemnity cover for a health care provider.

Healthcare provider organisations can access and view information in a record during a consultation. They could also access the record without the individual being present, provided that access is for the purpose of providing healthcare to the individual. For example, a specialist may choose to review clinical documents in an individual's record prior to a consultation.

By default, documents in the system are set to general access for healthcare providers. This means you can view all documents within an individual’s record, except for information that has been entered in the consumer-only notes section of the record, and any documents that the person has previously removed. Healthcare consumers can choose to add additional access controls to their record to restrict access to specific documents (using a limited document access code), or to their whole record (using a record access code). A provider will be prompted by their clinical software if an access code is required.

In certain circumstances, healthcare provider organisations can access information in a record using the emergency access function, which overrides consumer access controls. It's important to note, all use of the emergency access function is monitored.

Notifying a pathology and diagnostic imaging provider when a report should 'Not be uploaded to My Health Record'

If you do not want the reports uploaded, or the patient requests that they do not want their reports to be uploaded to their record, you should notify the diagnostics imaging provider by: 

  • checking the 'Do not send reports to My Health Record' check box in your practice management software, or 

  • checking the 'Do not send reports to My Health Record' check box on the paper referral form, or 

  • writing 'Do not send reports to My Health Record' on the request form. 

Find out which clinical information systems have been updated to support communication of 'Do not send reports to My Health Record'.

Healthcare provider organisation obligations

Healthcare provider organisations participating in the system are required to understand and comply with a range of legislative obligations, including the legislation listed in the "Legislation" section at the top of this page. It is important to understand your obligations prior to registering.

Ongoing participation obligations

Changes to your organisation

It is important to understand what changes your organisation may need to make before registering to participate in the system, and to ensure ongoing compliance with the above legislation.

User account management

You will need to confirm the IT system(s) staff use to access the My Health Record system employ reasonable user account management practices, including: restricting use, uniquely identifying users and secure access mechanisms (such as passwords).

Data quality

Your existing obligations to maintain your own detailed and accurate clinical records remains, and you are also responsible for ensuring that information uploaded to the system complies with your participation obligations. This includes ensuring your employees are registered healthcare providers (i.e. they have a healthcare provider identifier; HPI-I) before they author any record that will be uploaded to the system.

Additional participation obligations

Set out below are a number of ongoing obligations on a participating healthcare organisation. Please note, this is not an exhaustive list of obligations. If in doubt of your organisation’s obligations, you should contact the System Operator.

To participate in the system, your healthcare organisation must:

  • not discriminate against an individual because they do not have a digital health record or because of their My Health Record's access control settings
  • take reasonable steps to ensure that their employees exercise due care and skill so that any record uploaded to the system is at the time it is uploaded, accurate, up-to-date, not misleading and not defamatory
  • not upload a clinical document to the system where an individual has instructed them not to
  • only upload a clinical document to the My Health Record system that has been prepared by a person who is a registered healthcare provider (i.e. has an HPI-I) and whose registration is not conditional, suspended, cancelled or lapsed
  • tell the System Operator as soon as practicable after becoming aware of a potential or actual data breach, that is:
    • when there has been an unauthorised collection, use or disclosure of health information included in an individual's My Health Record
    • when an event has, or may have, occurred that compromises, or may compromise, the security or integrity of the My Health Record system
  • tell the System Operator, within two business days of becoming aware, of a non-clinical My Health Record system-related error in a record, or your organisation undergoes a material change
  • tell the System Operator within 14 days if your organisation has ceased to be eligible to be registered (for example, the organisation has cancelled its HPI-O)
  • give the System Operator necessary assistance in relation to any inquiry, audit, review, assessment, investigation or complaint regarding the My Health Record system
  • ensure that your security and access policy is reviewed annually, at a minimum, and kept up to date

Privacy and security obligations

All healthcare providers in Australia have professional and legal obligations to protect their patients' health information.

Establishing and maintaining information security practices is an essential professional and legal requirement when using digital health systems in the delivery of healthcare services.

Privacy legislation

The Privacy Act outlines the privacy responsibilities that most healthcare providers have to comply with in managing health and personal information. The key requirements are contained in the Australian Privacy Principles (APPs).

The Privacy Act applies to all healthcare providers in the private sector throughout Australia. It does not apply to state and territory public sector healthcare providers.

In most parts of Australia, state and territory legislation applies to public healthcare providers. In some states and territories, this legislation also applies to healthcare providers in the private sector, in addition to the Privacy Act. Visit the other privacy jurisdictions page on the Office of the Australian Information Commissioner (OAIC) website, for more information.

Additional information about healthcare provider obligations is available on the health service provider page of the OAIC website.

Healthcare Identifier and My Health Record system security obligations

Use of Healthcare Identifiers, and access to the My Health Record system, are governed by the Healthcare Identifiers Act, My Health Records Act, My Health Records Rule, and My Health Records Regulation.

The Healthcare Identifiers Act requires that an organisation take reasonable steps to protect healthcare identifiers from misuse and loss, and unauthorised access, modification or disclosure.

The My Health Records Rule sets out the security requirements that participating organisations must comply with to be eligible to be registered and to remain registered under the system. Non-compliance with the My Health Records Rule can result in cancellation of participation and other penalties.

Implementing security practices and policies

Your organisation must document and implement internal practices and procedures that it uses to protect personal information when using digital health systems to deliver healthcare.

In addition, healthcare organisations that access digital health records need to meet the requirements under the My Health Records Rule.

Please see the checklists in the "How to establish a security and access policy" section (above) as a guide to implementing security practices and policies in your organisation.

Additional information

You can also access a range of information security guidance materials from:

How to deregister

Healthcare provider organisations must ensure that they notify the Agency, as System Operator, within 14 days if they cease to be eligible for registration with the system. This may occur where the organisation, for example: 

  • is closing its business or has ceased trading 
  • is no longer eligible for registration under Section 43 of the My Health Records Act, for example, because the organisation no longer has a healthcare provider identifier for the organisation (HPI-O) or no longer employs a healthcare provider individual, which is a person who has a healthcare provider identifier for an individual (HPI-I). 

In some cases, such as where an organisation is closing its business or has ceased trading, a healthcare provider organisation may need to cancel its HPI-O in addition to deregistering from the system. Where a healthcare provider chooses to cancel its HPI-O, it will no longer have access to other important services in addition to the My Health Record system, such as electronic prescribing and secure messaging. 

To deregister from the system, and if applicable, cancel the HPI-O, log in to the Healthcare Provider Online Service (HPOS). Alternatively, you may call the HI Service Help Desk on 1300 361 457 to request assistance in deregistering from the system. 

How to report a clinical incident

All healthcare systems, including the My Health Record system and other digital health products, require careful monitoring to ensure that potential clinical incidents are identified and addressed.

clinical incident is defined by Australian Commission on Safety and Quality in Health Care ​​​​(ACSQHC) as "an event or circumstance that resulted, or could have resulted, in unintended and/or unnecessary harm to a person and/or a complaint, loss or damage".

A clinical incident can be related to safety, usability, technical, and privacy and/or security issues.

How are clinical incidents managed?

Users should report clinical incidents so the incident can be addressed and improvements made as needed. If you identify anything you think is a clinical incident or issue you should:

  1. Report the incident as soon as possible to the My Health Record Helpline, which is available 24 hours 7 days on 1800 723 471
  2. Contact your software vendor to see if the issue can be resolved locally, and if not, contact other parties (see below for which other parties to contact).

Issues with your local clinical software system:
Contact your software vendor's helpdesk

Issues with My Health Record system:
Contact Australian Digital Health Agency, My Health Record System Operator helpline 1800 723 471

Issues with Healthcare Identifiers Service:
Contact HI Service Enquiry Line on 1300 361 457

Issues with PKI certificates:
Services Australia eBusiness Service Centre for Medicare certificates 1800 700 199

Issues with Data privacy breaches:
For data breaches related to My Health Record, see guidance on how to manage a data breach on this page.

Issues with Other enabling products and services, ​​for example the National Clinical Terminology Information Service (AMT, SNOMED-CT-AU):
Australian Digital Health Agency Help Centre
[email protected]
1300 901 001
8am-6pm Mon-Fri (AEDT)

Issues with technical specifications:
Australian Digital Health Agency Help Centre
[email protected]
1300 901 001
8am-6pm Mon-Fri (AEDT)

How to manage a data breach

Healthcare provider organisations must notify the Australian Digital Health Agency of any potential or actual data breaches that relate to (or may relate to) the My Health Record system. Other data breaches that do not involve the system may need to be handled in accordance with the Privacy Act Notifiable Data Breaches scheme.

Data breaches - My Health Records Act

The characteristics of a breach of health and personal information relating to the system are outlined in the My Health Records Act.

According to the My Health Records Act, a data breach involves:

  • The unauthorised collection, use or disclosure of health information in an individual’s My Health Record; or
  • A situation where:
    a) an event that has, or may have, occurred or
    b) any circumstances have, or may have, arisen
    that compromise, may compromise, have compromised or may have compromised, the security or integrity of the My Health Record system (whether or not involving a contravention of the My Health Records Act).

Notification of data breaches - My Health Records Act

Entities using the system must notify the Australian Digital Health Agency (System Operator) of any potential or actual data breaches, as soon as possible. Even if the data breach has been resolved, you must still notify the Agency.

For example, if a healthcare provider’s system is infected with malicious software this could compromise their system and may allow unauthorised access to the information in the system. The provider would need to notify the Agency immediately and at the same time take steps to remove the malicious software from their system.

As the System Operator, we need to take steps to ensure all of the information in the system is secure. Healthcare consumers must also be allowed to take steps to mitigate any risks to their data.

Notifications are made in writing by contacting us.

See "Data breach notification - steps to follow" (below) for more information.

You can learn more by reviewing the OAIC’s Guide to mandatory data breach notification in the My Health Record system.

Data breach notification steps

A number of steps should be followed when notifying the Australian Digital Health Agency of a potential or actual data breach relating to the system. The information on this page provides an overview of these steps.

Steps for healthcare providers
If you suspect a data breach has, or may have, occurred, the following steps need to be followed. 

1. Contain 
  • Take appropriate steps to immediately contain the situation. 
  • The action required will depend on what has occurred. For example, you may need to disable user accounts, instruct users to change passwords, or disconnect the system while taking care to maintain evidence. 
  • Take steps to reduce the harm healthcare recipients may suffer as a result of the situation. 
  • In the case of a security incident, notify the Australian Digital Health Agency as soon as possible, to minimise any potential risk to the My Health Record system. 
2. Assess 
  • Undertake an initial assessment of the impact and extent of the situation. 
  • Identify what personal information was or may have been affected, and consider whether this information relates to the My Health Record system.
  • Determine the cause of the situation (for example, human error, inappropriate behaviour, security attack).
  • Identify what initial action may need to be undertaken to minimise the impact of the situation. 
3. Manage notifications 
  • Notify the person or team within your organisation who is responsible for My Health Record privacy, security and compliance. 
  • Notify the Agency if: 
    • the matter relates to a contravention involving unauthorised collection, use or disclosure of information in a person’s My Health Record, or 
    • a security incident has occurred, even if you are not certain whether My Health Record information is affected. 
  • Notify the Office of the Australian Information Commissioner (OAIC), except where your healthcare organisation is a state or territory authority or instrumentality. Notify OAIC in relation to: 
    • the matter relates to a contravention involving unauthorised collection, use or disclosure of information in a person’s My Health Record, or 
    • a security incident has occurred, even if you are not certain whether My Health Record information is affected. 
    • For non-My Health Record related matters, refer to the Privacy Act Notifiable Data Breaches scheme information. 
  • Ask the Agency to notify all healthcare consumers that may be affected; or the general public if a significant number of people are impacted. (Note: My Health Record legislation requires healthcare providers to ask that the Agency notify healthcare recipients. This is a requirement even if the healthcare provider has already contacted the healthcare recipients). 
4. Continue investigation 
  • Conduct an extensive investigation to determine the extent of the situation (there is an expectation that this occur at the earliest opportunity). 
  • Take actions to prevent similar situations occurring in the future. 
  • Provide updates to the Agency and the OAIC in relation to any additional findings. 

Timing of notifications

When a healthcare entity becomes aware a system data breach has, or may have, occurred, the relevant parties must be notified. If you think a data breach may have occurred, but this hasn’t been confirmed, you still need to submit a data breach notification. 

Notifiable Data Breaches scheme - Privacy Act

There are some situations where a data breach does not have to be reported under the My Health Records Act. This could include, for example, where a data breach does not relate to the My Health Record System at all.

These data breaches, however, may still need to be handled in accordance with Privacy Act  Notifiable Data Breaches scheme, which includes a requirement to notify the Office of the Australian Information Commissioner (OAIC) when a data breach is likely to result in serious harm to any individuals whose personal information is involved in the breach.

For more information about the Privacy Act Notifiable Data Breaches scheme or how it interacts with the My Health Record Act data breach notification obligations, visit the OAIC’s website.

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